Discrimination and Harassment

In one of her first acts after being sworn in for her second term in the Assembly, Assemblymember Eloise Reyes (D-San Bernardino) introduced, along with Assemblymember Laura Friedman, AB 9 which extends the administrative timeline to bring forward a complaint of workplace harassment from one year to three years pursuant to the Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA).

The Cato Corporation, a leading retailer of women's fashion and accessories, has agreed to pay $3.5 million to resolve a nationwide, systemic investigation conducted jointly out of the Chicago and Philadelphia Offices of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). The Cato Corporation, based in Charlotte, N.C., has also agreed to update its reasonable accommodation policies to ensure there is no discrimination against pregnant employees or those with disabilities. According to the EEOC’s investigation, The Cato Corporation denied reasonable accommodations to certain pregnant employees or those with disabilities, made certain employees take unpaid leaves of absence, and/or terminated them because of their disabilities. 

The agreement between EEOC and The Cato Corporation provides for a claims process to distribute the $3.5 million to Cato employees who were terminated due to their pregnancy or disabilities. The Cato Corporation has also agreed to revise its employment policies to more fully consider whether medical restrictions of its pregnant employees or those with disabilities can be reasonably accommodated. The Cato Corporation will also conduct companywide training for over 10,000 of its employees and report to the EEOC periodically for three years on its responses to requests for reasonable accommodation by pregnant employees or those with disabilities.

"Giving employees a job modification that allows them to continue working can be a critical reasonable accommodation for pregnant women or people with disabilities when they really need that paycheck," said EEOC Chicago District Director Julianne Bowman. For more information read here. 

SB 1343, in effect as January 1, 2019, expands the required AB 1825 harassment training to cover employers with five (5) or more employees (as opposed to employers with 50 or more employers), to include all nonsupervisory employees.

Family HealthCare Network has agreed to pay $1.75 million and furnish other relief to settle a disability and pregnancy  discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission  (EEOC).

The California Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) has settled an employment discrimination case with the County of Los Angeles involving two complainants who were allegedly denied or delayed positions with the County due to the County’s pre-employment medical examination requirements, which the DFEH alleged were overly broad.

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has released its FY 2018 sexual harassment data today - highlighting its work over the past fiscal year to address the pervasive problem of workplace harassment.

The U.S. District Court has approved a settlement between Alorica, Inc. and the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) for $3.5 million to resolve a sexual harassment lawsuit.

A group of female workers claim that Facebook and 10 other employers engaged in unlawful gender discrimination by excluding them from job ads.

The U.S. District Court approved a consent decree between Alorica, Inc. and the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) for $3.5 million and remedial measures to resolve a sexual harassment lawsuit.

The U.S. Supreme Court, in a highly anticipated case, ruled that employers can require as a condition of employment that workers waive their rights to participate in class action lawsuits as part of an arbitration agreement.

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