Discrimination and Harassment

The California Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) has settled an employment discrimination case with the County of Los Angeles involving two complainants who were allegedly denied or delayed positions with the County due to the County’s pre-employment medical examination requirements, which the DFEH alleged were overly broad.

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has released its FY 2018 sexual harassment data today - highlighting its work over the past fiscal year to address the pervasive problem of workplace harassment.

The U.S. District Court has approved a settlement between Alorica, Inc. and the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) for $3.5 million to resolve a sexual harassment lawsuit.

A group of female workers claim that Facebook and 10 other employers engaged in unlawful gender discrimination by excluding them from job ads.

The U.S. District Court approved a consent decree between Alorica, Inc. and the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) for $3.5 million and remedial measures to resolve a sexual harassment lawsuit.

The U.S. Supreme Court, in a highly anticipated case, ruled that employers can require as a condition of employment that workers waive their rights to participate in class action lawsuits as part of an arbitration agreement.

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeal has ruled that salary history cannot be used to justify paying less to women in comparable jobs.

The U.S. Supreme Court, in Digital Reality Inc. v. Somers, has narrowed the definition of "whistleblower." The case involves Paul Somers, who was the Vice President at Digital Realty Trust, Inc., from 2010 to 2014. During this time he filed reports to senior management about possible securities law violations by the company. Digital Realty eventually terminated Somers, and he filed suit in the U.S. district court for California, alleging that Digital Realty terminated him for his reports of securities law violations in violation of the anti-retaliation protections of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. Dodd-Frank was passed in 2010 following the 2008 financial crisis and expanded the whistleblower incentives and protections under the 2002 Sarbanese-Oxley Act. The district court held Somers was a “whistleblower” under the statute, and the Ninth Circuit affirmed the district court’s decision on behalf of Somers. Digital Realty subsequently appealed to the Supreme Court on the grounds that Somers was not a “whistleblower” as defined by Dodd-Frank because Somers did not report his concerns to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) before he was terminated. On January 21, 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its decision, overturning the 9th Circuit by holding that Somers was not a “whistleblower” as defined by Dodd-Frank, because he did not first report his claims to the SEC. Read more here.  

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has completed its mailing of the 2017 “EEO-1 Survey Notification Letters” to employers.

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has announced that 84,254 workplace discrimination charges were filed with the federal agency nationwide during fiscal year (FY) 2017.

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