Super User

Super User

In a major victory for Uber Technologies, Inc., the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeal reversed a lower court’s ruling that certified a class of current and former drivers, and ruled that the claims against Uber for misclassifying their drivers as independent contractors must be filed individually as opposed to a class action.

A former Facebook content moderator, Selena Scola, is suing Facebook alleging that she developed Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) from reviewing disturbing material on a daily basis as part of her job duties.

A group of female workers claim that Facebook and 10 other employers engaged in unlawful gender discrimination by excluding them from job ads.

The U.S. District Court approved a consent decree between Alorica, Inc. and the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) for $3.5 million and remedial measures to resolve a sexual harassment lawsuit.

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that public sector workers who are represented by unions cannot be required to pay union dues.

Bloomberg News is reporting that Wells Fargo & Co. must pay $97 million to home mortgage consultants and private mortgage bankers in California who didn’t get the breaks they were entitled to under the state’s stringent labor laws.

Companies with 250 or more employees that are currently required to keep OSHA injury and illness records, and companies with 20-249 employees that are classified in certain industries with historically high rates of occupational injuries and illnesses, must now electronically submit OSHA Form 300A.

In a long anticipated decision, the California Supreme Court in  Dynamex Operations West, Inc. v. Superior Court of Los Angeles, No. S222732 (Cal. Sup. Ct. Apr. 30, 2018), has adopted a new test, known as the “ABC” test for determining whether an individual is an employee versus an independent contractor under the Wage Orders.

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that service advisers are salesmen and therefore exempt from overtime requirements, pursuant to federal law (the Fair Labor Standards Act).

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeal has ruled that salary history cannot be used to justify paying less to women in comparable jobs.

Headlines