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The U.S. District Court approved a consent decree between Alorica, Inc. and the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) for $3.5 million and remedial measures to resolve a sexual harassment lawsuit.

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that public sector workers who are represented by unions cannot be required to pay union dues.

Bloomberg News is reporting that Wells Fargo & Co. must pay $97 million to home mortgage consultants and private mortgage bankers in California who didn’t get the breaks they were entitled to under the state’s stringent labor laws.

Companies with 250 or more employees that are currently required to keep OSHA injury and illness records, and companies with 20-249 employees that are classified in certain industries with historically high rates of occupational injuries and illnesses, must now electronically submit OSHA Form 300A.

In a long anticipated decision, the California Supreme Court in  Dynamex Operations West, Inc. v. Superior Court of Los Angeles, No. S222732 (Cal. Sup. Ct. Apr. 30, 2018), has adopted a new test, known as the “ABC” test for determining whether an individual is an employee versus an independent contractor under the Wage Orders.

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that service advisers are salesmen and therefore exempt from overtime requirements, pursuant to federal law (the Fair Labor Standards Act).

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeal has ruled that salary history cannot be used to justify paying less to women in comparable jobs.

The U.S. Supreme Court, in Digital Reality Inc. v. Somers, has narrowed the definition of "whistleblower." The case involves Paul Somers, who was the Vice President at Digital Realty Trust, Inc., from 2010 to 2014. During this time he filed reports to senior management about possible securities law violations by the company. Digital Realty eventually terminated Somers, and he filed suit in the U.S. district court for California, alleging that Digital Realty terminated him for his reports of securities law violations in violation of the anti-retaliation protections of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. Dodd-Frank was passed in 2010 following the 2008 financial crisis and expanded the whistleblower incentives and protections under the 2002 Sarbanese-Oxley Act. The district court held Somers was a “whistleblower” under the statute, and the Ninth Circuit affirmed the district court’s decision on behalf of Somers. Digital Realty subsequently appealed to the Supreme Court on the grounds that Somers was not a “whistleblower” as defined by Dodd-Frank because Somers did not report his concerns to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) before he was terminated. On January 21, 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its decision, overturning the 9th Circuit by holding that Somers was not a “whistleblower” as defined by Dodd-Frank, because he did not first report his claims to the SEC. Read more here.  

Federal immigration agents raided 77 businesses in Northern California this week, demanding proof that their employees are legally allowed to work in the United States, officials said.

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has completed its mailing of the 2017 “EEO-1 Survey Notification Letters” to employers.

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